Cattleya [C.] walkeriana
Pronounced: wal-ker-ee-AH-na (named for E. Walker, 19th cent collector
in Brazil)
Author: Gardner, London J. Bot. 2: 662 (1843).
Common Name: Walker's Cattleya
Based on data from 210 awards C. walkeriana averages 2.2 flowers per
inflorescence and 9.6 cm. (3.8 inches) natural spread.
Photography by J. Cook
ORIGIN/HABITAT: Brazil. C. walkeriana is found over a large region of the interior south of the Amazon Basin,
including the States of Minas Gerais, Goiás, and Mato Grosso. Brasilia is just west of the center of this area of
distribution, Belo Horizonte is near the southeast edge, and Goiania is near the western edge. Within this overall area
of distribution, plants are usually found at 2000-3000 ft. (610-910 m), growing in two distinct types of habitat. In one
type, plants are found on very rough barked trees which grow in an alkaline environment on limestone bluffs, ridges,
and mesas known locally as pedreiros. While the region is very dry much of the year, the limestone of the pedreiros is
able to soak up and retain large amounts of water during the rainy season. This moisture is given up very slowly as the
surrounding trees respire it into the air through their leaf surfaces, providing a relatively stable source of high
microclimate humidity in an otherwise dry environment. The second type environment, known locally as chapada, is
in regions where the limestone was not deposited on the underlying granite. The relatively flat granite plateau has been
cut by eroding streams, leaving almost perpendicular cliffs as much as 1000 ft. (300 m) tall on either side. C.
walkeriana is found in this habitat where streams plunge over the edge of the cliffs. They usually grow with their roots
attached to bare granite rocks near the top of the cliffs along with lithophytic cacti, succulents, and epiphyllums. Some
plants are found on rough-barked trees near the edge of the cliffs, but they are never very far from streams or areas
with permanent water seepages. Moisture rising from the waterfalls condenses as soon as the temperature starts to drop
in the evening and quickly covers plants and rocks in the vicinity with large amounts of water, even during the dry
season. -- Source: Charles Baker
*Based on 116 recorded plant bloomings.
Grow in dappled light to
bright indirect light
conditions.
Grow in warm conditions, or 66°F to
75°F at night.
 2011 Nov 5 Created with OrchidWiz software Page 1 of 1